Montessori Classroom Setting

SETTING UP A MONTESSORI CHILDREN’S HOUSE: THE ESSENTIAL MATERIALS
Montessori classroom environment must be colourful and attractive and to achieve this, you must come up with the list of materials you will order or purchase and do some pricing to see if you could afford everything you will need in your Montessori classroom. Milestone Education Consult will help you set-up your Montessori Classroom with quality and reliable Montessori materials in:
  • Practical Life
  • Sensorial
  • Mathematics
  • Language
  • Cultural 
INTRODUCTION TO PRACTICAL LIFE
 
What is Practical Life?
 
Practical: means basic, useful, purposeful
Life: means the way of living.
Practical life is the exercises that teach a child how to do living activities in a purposeful way.
 
Meaning and Purpose of Practical Life
 The purpose and aim of Practical Life is to help the child gain control in the coordination of his movement, and help the child to gain independence and adapt to his society. It is therefore important to “Teach teaching, not correcting” (Montessori) in order to allow the child to be a fully functional member in his own society. Practical Life Exercises also aid the growth and development of the child’s intellect and concentration and will in turn also help the child develop an orderly way of thinking.
 
Children are naturally interested in activities they have witnessed. Therefore, “Practical Life Exercises” allow the child to do activities of daily life and therefore adapt and orientate himself in his society.  It is therefore the Directress’s task to demonstrate the correct way of doing these Exercises in a way that allows the child to fully observe the movements. Montessori says, “If talking don’t move, if moving don’t talk”.
 
Montessori also saw the child’s need for order, repetition, and succession in movements. Practical Life Exercises also helps to aid the child to develop his coordination in movement, his balance and his gracefulness in his environment as well as his need to develop the power of being silent.
 
INTRODUCTION TO SENSORIAL
Sensorial comes from the words sense or senses. As there are no new experiences for the child to take from the Sensorial work, the child is able to concentrate on the refinement of all his senses, from visual to stereognostic. The purpose and aim of Sensorial work is for the child to acquire clear, conscious, information and to be able to make classifications in his environment. Montessori believed that sensorial experiences began at birth. Through his senses, the child studies his environment. Through this study, the child then begins to understand his environment. The child, to Montessori, is a “sensorial explorer”.
 
Through work with the sensorial materials, the child is given the keys to classifying the things around him/her, which leads to the child making his own experiences in his environment. Through the classification, the child is also offered the first steps in organizing his intelligence, which then leads to his adapting to his environment.
 
INTRODUCTION TO LANGUAGE
Language is a system of symbols with an agreed upon meaning that is used by a group of people. Language is a means of communication ideas or feelings by the use of conventionalized sounds and signs, thus, being the spoken and written language. It is a human tendency to communicate with others and this could underlie the emergence of language. Montessori said, “To talk is in the nature of man.” Humans needed language in order to communicate, and soon, the powers that come with language were revealed. The evolution of the human language began when communication was done through pictograms or pictures and drawings.
 
It then developed into ideograms when pictures began to turn into symbols. Later, these symbols became words, words involved letters, vowels emerged, one symbol came to represent one sound, and an alphabet was created, and then came the alphabet we now use today. And just as language evolved hundreds of thousands of years ago, it also changes with each generation. Unneeded words are dropped and new words come into use. Language rose and continues to rise with the collective intelligence.
 
When the child arrives in the Montessori classroom, he has fully absorbed his culture’s language. He has already constructed the spoken language and with his entry into the classroom, he will begin to consolidate the spoken language and begin to explore the written forms of language. Because language is involved in the process of thinking, the child will need to be spoken to and listened to often. The child will need a broad exposure to language, with correct articulation, enunciation, and punctuation. The child will need to experience different modes of language and to hear and tell stories. Most importantly, the child needs to feel free and be encouraged to communicate with others.
 
INTRODUCTION TO MATHEMATICS
Math is all around the young child from day one. How old are you? In one hour you will go to school. You were born on the 2nd. Number itself cannot be defined and understand of number grows from experience with real objects but eventually they become abstract ideas. It is one of the most abstract concepts that the human mind has encountered. No physical aspects of objects can ever suggest the idea of number. The ability to count, to compute, and to use numerical relationships are among the most significant among human achievements. The concept of number is not the contribution of a single individual but is the product of a gradual, social evolution. The number system which has been created over thousands of years is an abstract invention. It began with the realization of one and then more than one. It is marvellous to see the readiness of the child’s understanding of this same concept.
 
Arithmetic deals with shape, space, numbers, and their relationships and attributes by the use of numbers and symbols. It is a study of the science of pattern and includes patterns of all kinds, such as numerical patterns, abstract patterns, patterns of shape and motion. In the Montessori classroom, five families with math are presented to the child: arithmetic, geometry, statistics and calculus. More precisely, the concepts covered in the Primary class are numeration, the decimal system, computation, the arithmetic tables, whole numbers, fractions, and positive numbers. We offer arithmetic to the child in the final two years of the first place of developments from age four to age five and six. Arithmetic is the science of computing using positive real numbers. It is specifically the process of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The materials of the Primary Montessori classroom also present sensorial experiences in geometry and algebra.  Little children are naturally attracted to the science of number. Mathematics, like language, is the product of the human intellect.
 
It is therefore part of the nature of a human being. Mathematics arises from the human mind as it comes into contact with the world and as it contemplates the universe and the factors of time and space. It under girds the effort of the human to understand the world in which he lives. All humans exhibit this mathematical propensity, even little children. It can therefore be said that human kind has a mathematical mind.
 
Montessori took this idea that the human has a mathematical mind. The mathematical mind tends to estimate, needs to quantify, to see identity, similarity, difference, and patterns, to make order and sequence and to control error. The infant and young child observes and experiences the world sensorial. From this experience the child abstracts concepts and qualities of the things in the environment. These concepts allow the child to create mental order. The child establishes a mental map, which supports adaptation to the environment and the changes which may occur in it.
 
CULTURAL
The Cultural area of the Montessori classroom covers a variety of subjects. Geography, Science, Botany, Zoology, and History are included. Art and Music are also considered a part of the Cultural Area of the classroom. The Montessori cultural studies are another thing that makes the Montessori classroom different from other ones. 
 
Geography, Science, Botany, and Zoology are focus of the Cultural Area. Art and Music are in their own category.  History is covered in greater detail as the children progress through the elementary part of a Montessori school. Unit studies that are found in the curriculum pages, is where the Cultural breakdown for the classroom is found. Daily group lessons are based on these four main areas of the Cultural part of the classroom. The curriculum is organized into monthly unit studies and throughout the month, subjects in Geography, Botany, Zoology, and Science are discussed.
 
Geography – Subjects discussed in Geography are things such as; land, air, and water, maps, continents, people, food and music from other countries.
 
Science – Subjects discussed in science include; four seasons, the five senses, why leaves change color, layers of the earth, parts of a volcano, and biomes of the earth
 
Zoology – This is the area where the focus is learning about animals. The vertebrates and Invertebrates animals will be discussed.
 
Botany – Seeds, parts of a plant, kinds of trees, herbs and spices, and what plants give us, are some of the unit studies that are discussed in Botany